A Collection of Disability Double Bills

A split collage with the words "DOUBLE BILL" in bold On the left, a bearded man with his finger to his mouth, gesturing a "shush" motion. On the right, two people are holding hands in a subway tunnel which is covered in bodies lying on the floor. The collage is split down in the middle with a white outline between the two images.

Article CW: Disability Discrimination, Sex Abuse

Letterboxd List

FEATURE: A QUIET PLACE (2018), DIR. JOHN KRASINSKI

SHORT: DAWN OF THE DEAF (2016), DIR. ROB SAVAGE

Krasinski’s critical and commercial success tells the story of a family living in a post-apocalyptic world overrun by blind extra-terrestrial creatures with heightened hearing. The family communicates using American Sign Language (ASL), a language they already knew before the apocalypse. The daughter of the family, Regan (Millicent Simmons), is Deaf herself and wears a cochlear implant. A Quiet Place is an atmospheric masterpiece, symbolising the empowerment of Deaf people through the evolutionary means of visual communication, which has driven the family’s survival. The film’s harnessing of elemental fears and tension has raised the bar for horror as a genre. Deafness, Deaf culture and deaf adaptations are perceived as solutions rather than burdens, shaping a new narrative for disability and Deaf representation within the genre of horror.

Still from the film A Quiet Place. A man holding a young boy, a woman, and a young girl are all walking in a line facing the camera. They're wearing jackets and backpacks, and the background is a forest landscape.
Image courtesy of Platinum Dunes, Sunday Night Productions

Dawn of the Deaf is the perfect companion for A Quiet Place, both of which illustrate the survival advantages of deafness during an apocalypse. Savage’s 12-minute short film is an ambitious, but original insight into unexplored zombie territory. This film focuses on four narratives: two deaf women being taunted on the street; a deaf man accepting an award; a deaf lesbian couple arguing, and a deaf teenager being sexually abused by her stepfather. An ominous sonic pulse infects the hearing population, catalysing a zombie apocalypse and threatening the survival of the film’s deaf characters. The sound editing is impressive, and the subtitling format in one particular scene is an imaginative interpretation of perspective that isn’t often seen on-screen. Savage’s short is a captivating snippet of an unconventional zombie story that brings Deaf talent and British Sign Language to the forefront. Although Dawn of the Deaf acts as a precursor more than a standalone film, it leaves audiences hungry for more.

Still from the film Dawn of the Deaf. Two women are holding hands in a subway tunnel, and the floor is covered in bodies,
Image courtesy of Shadowhouse Films

FEATURE: THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON (2019), DIR. TYLER NILSEN, MICHAEL SCHWARTZ

FEATURE: 37 SECONDS (2019), DIR. HIKARI 

The Peanut Butter Falcon tells the story of Zak (Zack Gottsagen), a young man with Down Syndrome, who runs away from a nursing home to fulfil his dream: becoming a professional wrestler. Along the way, he meets Tyler (Shia LaBeouf), a wayward outlaw. The film’s success is partly owed to Gottsagen’s presence, an actor with Down Syndrome, whose performance embodies the lived experiences of a disabled person’s reality. The Peanut Butter Falcon is a cosy and heartfelt narrative about a young disabled person breaking free from the confines of ableism and infantilisation to pursue their hopes and dreams.

Still from the film The Peanut Butter Falcon. Two men and a woman are on a makeshift sailing boat in a body of water. The sun is setting.
Image courtesy of Armory Films, Lucky Treehouse, Bona Fide Productions, Endeavor Content

37 Seconds is a Japanese drama about Yuma, a young disabled woman who explores her sexual freedom and personal liberation while pursuing a career in manga. The lead is played by actress Mei Kayama, who has cerebral palsy and uses a powerchair. This gem of a film is an honest but gentle examination of society’s desexualisation and infantilisation of disabled people. The Peanut Butter Falcon and 37 Seconds are modern examples of young disabled characters challenging preconceived societal perceptions of disability.

Still from the film 37 Seconds. A young woman with black hair is sitting in her powerchair on the bus. She's wearing a baseball cap and is looking outside the window with a content expression on her face.
Image courtesy of Knockonwood, Hikari Films

FEATURE: CRIP CAMP: A DISABILITY REVOLUTION (2020), DIR. NICOLE NEWNHAM, JIM LEBRECHT

FEATURE: RISING PHOENIX (2020), DIR. IAN BONHÔTE, PETER ETTEDGUI

Crip Camp is a remarkable documentary regaling the stories of a rickety summer camp for disabled teenagers in Woodstock, New York. These campers catalysed the beginning of a revolutionary disability rights movement, carving a path for equal rights and policy changes for disabled Americans. The film focuses on the campers turned activists who fought for access and legislation, creating systematic change for disabled people across the United States. This documentary is intertwined with vintage footage and modern-day interviews, providing a detailed and layered timeline of the historic events that took place. Crip Camp is the education we all need.

Still from the documentary Crip Camp. This is a vintage black and white photo of a Black man holding a shirtless white man, and they're both laughing. A white shirtless man with one hand is next to them, and a shirtless white man in a wheelchair is behind them. They are on a field and there is a white cabin like building in the background.
Image courtesy of Higher Grounds Productions, Rusted Spoke, Little Punk, Just Films, Ford Foundation

Rising Phoenix is another striking disability-centred documentary released by Netflix. This captivating film illustrates the extraordinary tale of the Paralympic Games, emphasising the strength and power of sheer human determination. Rising Phoenix features a diverse line-up of Paralympians and Paralympic Games organisers, as they explore the roots of the Games and their stories as disabled athletes. The film addresses inequality for disabled people within sports, and how one American Paralympian successfully sued for disabled people to have the legal right to participate in sports. This film captures the spirit of the Paralympics, passing the baton onto the next generation of Paralympians.

Both films are celebrations of disability and perseverance, whilst never failing to forget the inequalities and discrimination that disabled people still face today.

Still from the documentary Rising Phoenix. A from the ground shot of a Black man with one leg and a blade jumping in the air. The sky is a vast blue.
Image courtesy of HTYT Films, Passion Pictures, Misfits Entertainment, Ventureland